Tag Archives: Doritt Carroll

New review for Doritt Carroll’s GLTTL STP

Featured on Washington Independent Review Of Books, Grace Cavalieri reviewed Doritt Carroll’s GLTTL STP while showcasing Carroll’s poems.

Check out Cavalieri’s review below:

GLTTL STPThe title stands for glottal stop, a choking sound produced in the throat; and the words’ conversion to a book title without vowels is just one  sample of a woman who is a risk taker and a safety net all it once. Dorrit Carroll is sublime. What does she do and how does she do it? First, we start with the quality of her mind – the poem cannot be any better than the person who presses it into being. Her mind is like a giant constellation from which tiny zodiacs occur perfectly formed.

From the poem father:

… I say that I can’t miss you/because you are inside me/is it your lips/or mine/that press together/as if they are sealing off/an envelope of disappointment//your or my finicky way/of straightening a desk/pinching each paperclip/between thumb and forefinger/as if it’s a dead fly//and whose measuring eyes/appraise me/from the mirror//composed/perhaps/to a fault

Or look at this poem titled p.m.:

the night you/ gurgled yourself dead/your breaths sounded like/bubbles blown through a stroll//as if the milk of you were being drunk /by a greedy child somewhere/with no manners// and then at last the straw hit/the bottom of the glass/because the bubble stopped//and you/glass that you were/looked no different/empty/than you had/full

Sometimes she just snapshots a scene:

the Christmas trees

lie on their sides

on the curb

as if they’d been shot

just steps from their

front doors

as if they’d almost

made it

to safety

Doritt Carroll’s poetry is concrete and allegorical at once. Poetry never repeats itself and yet   poems are made of the same old words we all use. Caroll’s impulses are her ideas. She hones each thought diligently until it acts precisely the way she chooses. Anyone can have a flash/an inspiration, but the implementation tells all. These are carefully made poems from templates that have antecedents in our craft, but that are particularly targeted on a page that could belong to no one else. Who knows what Carroll is made of and she, herself, wonders here:

valentine

the heart

is a complicated instrument
 

four adjoining chambers

in which
 

God knows what

goes on

To check out more of Cavalieri’s reviews, go here.

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Don’t forget about this upcoming reading event!

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by | April 4, 2014 · 2:29 pm

Proof that science and law can mix with creativity: an interview with Doritt Carroll and Lalita Noronha

By: Shelby Hillers

Doritt Carroll, author of GLTTL STP, and Lalita Noronha, author of Her Skin Phyllo-Thin, don’t have their degrees in English. But that doesn’t stop them from writing and being published.

dorittcarroll Carroll (photographed left), a lawyer, received her undergraduate and law degrees from Georgetown University. Her works, In Caves and GLTTL STP, were published by BrickHouse Books. The title poem was then nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Her poems have appeared in several different magazines and journal reviews.

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Noronha (photographed right), a native of India, came to America to earn her Ph.D. in microbiology. She has won the Maryland Literary Short Story Award twice (1997, 2001), a Maryland Individual Artist Award (2002), the National League of American Pen Women, and other awards. Her work consists of Where Monsoons Cry (fiction) and Her Skin Phyllo-thin (poetry). Noronha is also a fiction editor for the Baltimore Review and a retired science teacher at St. Paul’s School for Girls.

Yet based on their professional work experience, you’d never think the two would be successful authors with published works. Both authors will be at the reading event on April 10 at the Mark Cottman Gallery to promote their works.

To get to know the authors a little better, I was able to interview the two by email where the authors talked about their passion for writing, their hopes for the reading event, and advice for any writers out there.

 BrickHouse Books: What motivates you to write and what motivated you to write your works?

Doritt Carroll: Writers write.  It’s what we do. I never believe people who say they’re going to write a novel when they retire.  If you’re going to be a novelist, you’re compelled to write, right now.  You’ll neglect their work and forget to eat to get it on the paper.

GLTTL STP With regard to GLTTL STP in particular – unlike a lot of poets, who select a title after they’ve written a manuscript, I find a title and it tells me what book to write.  A “glottal stop” is a term of art in singing.  It means a moment when you stop the sound without taking a new breath.  So GLTTL STP (with its strangled spelling) is a book about things not said.  Sometimes it’s good that we didn’t say them, and sometimes it isn’t.

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Lalita Noronha: The title of this work [Her Skin Phyllo-Thin] refers to my mother. She first came to America at the age of 59 to take care of her first grandchild so that I could return to work. She was 86 when she died in India. Watching her slowly grow older and weaker was hard. The distance between our countries made frequent visits impossible. So we were always aware that any meeting could well be the last. As Michael Salcman wrote, “These are feminist poems in the strongest, must subtle sense, filled with the knowledge that flows across generations from grandmother and mother to a daughter who is both scientist and poet.”

Included in the book are other poems of separation—immigration, divorce, youth—as well as some science and ekphrastic poems which seemed to fit the theme.

BHB: Doritt, you have your law degree and are well experienced in the field.  What attracts you to creative writing then?

DC: If there’s a lawyer who ever actually wanted to be lawyer, I haven’t met her yet.  Law is something you do to put food on the table.  Nonetheless, it has taught me something useful, namely, that you can work hard and excel at something that you don’t enjoy.  Let’s put to rest forever the notion that there is such a thing as an “artistic temperament.”  Nobody wants to do hard, painstaking work.  but you can.  a phrase you hear in sports is very relevant here – “there’s a world of difference between ‘can’t’ and ‘don’t want to.’”  Law taught me that I could do excellent work in a field that offered me no inspiration whatsoever. The other thing law is good for is embedding the notion that each word has a mathematical value.  In law, “plaintiff” or “contract” has to mean the exact same thing every time it’s used in a document.  It takes discipline to work with mathematical words and put them into correct sentence-equations.  Then, when you write poetry, you get to explode it all and let a word mean a different thing every time it occurs in a stanza.

 

BhB: Lalita, you have your Ph.D in Microbiology, an amazing background in scientific writing, and experience in the scientific field. What attracts you to creative writing then?

LN: Well, back home in India, there wasn’t much of a dichotomy between science and literature. My parents, both educators, pretty much encouraged all learning. My father was a botany professor; my mother was a English and Geography teacher. But we had literary books all over the place juxtaposed with volumes of plant and animal life.

When I was 11 years old, my 5-year-old sister died from colon cancer (unheard of in those days) and I began writing about her because I wanted my siblings, all under the age of 7, to know her. It was the first time I experienced the immeasurable gift of solace that writing brings. The poem, “Mustard Seed” in my poetry book is for her.

Although I chose to major in botany in college all my friends were from the English department. That’s where I spent my free periods. I belonged to the “Shakespeare Society,” and acted in Bernard Shaw’s You Never Can Tell and Tennessee Williams The Glass Menagerie. And I read as much as I could of whatever my friends read. But I had no formal training in literature. Science was my focus because I needed scholarships and assistantships to come to America, and science was my only ticket– although honestly, I love science just as much as creative writing. I don’t think I’ve ever lived with one without the other.

BhB: Are people usually shocked when you tell them you write poetry and fiction? If so, why do you think that?

DC: I think people are more shocked when I tell them I’m a lawyer.  I usually get some version of “but you’re so  . . . pleasant.”  I think people are less shocked to hear that I write poetry than they are when they read the actual poems.  As my friend says about the contrast between my appearance and my work, “who knew the president of the PTA was thinking THAT?”

LN: Well, actually my very first publication came early in my writing career–a paid creative nonfiction piece in Catholic Digest, so that’s where I thought I should focus. But by then I’d begun writing stories, and later usurped my own lyrical phrases into what would eventually become poems. The simple truth is that I just love writing.

My writer friends aren’t exactly shocked at my waffling between genres. Some believe it dilutes one’s focus, and impedes mastery over any one form, sort of like being a jack of all trades and master of none–and rightly so. But I am done climbing ladders as a scientist. My writing life is mine to plork! (play and work)

BhB: Doritt, does having your law degree help with your writing at all?

DC: See response to question 2, supra.  (hint:  that’s both the answer and a law joke).

 

BhB: Lalita, how do you incorporate Indian culture into your stories? Do you think this helps you stand out from other writers?

 LN: Well, I was born and raised in small towns in India, and only came to the US in my early twenties, so India runs in my blood, and seeps naturally into narratives. It’s easy because I have authentic experiences of the basic elements of fiction–setting, characters, plot, and so on. But I feel the same way now that America is my home. My novel (in the agent-seeking stage) is set in Bombay and Baltimore. My short stories and poems often deal with separation, dislocation and cross-cultural issues. I feel blessed that my readers relate to my work because ultimately these are human issues. After all, home isn’t a physical space and in that sense everyone leaves home.

As an Indian woman, I suppose it helps me stand apart from western writers, but no more so than other groups, because the emotions associated with loss or joy are universal.

BhB: What do you hope to gain from the upcoming reading event?

DC: Ummmm . . . the same thing I hope for every reading – that I entertain people and help them to understand my poems.

LN: First, I hope that people will come to listen since I’m longing to read my work to them. This is my first poetry book and I’d like to get some exposure as a poet. I also hope to reach people who don’t usually read or like poetry because they just might surprise themselves. My work is unpretentious and accessible. I’m also excited to meet and read with Doritt Carroll at a beautiful location, Mark Cottman’s Gallery in Fells Point. I think it will be a lovely evening for everyone.

BhB: What advice do you have for aspiring writers?

DC: Write. And then improve what you write.  You improve by reading a lot of poets and figuring out how they solved the problems you find yourself in.  Gerry Connolly, author of Province of Fire, taught me that in the first workshop I ever attended. Take a hard, unsentimental look at the world around you, and then put what you see down on paper.

LN: I don’t honestly feel qualified to give people any advice, per se. I began writing late in life, and “became a writer” only when I discovered “free summers” (teaching science) and turned away from life as a research scientist. So, I’m driven by knowing that time is short. And if I forget, my left knee reminds me. So, if I want to write, I have to just do it. That’s really what it’s about.

It’s not a choice if you’re one of few fortunate writers who make a living by writing. But it is, for many writers. I inspire myself by reading writers whose work I love or just staring out a window. I teach and attend workshops; simple writing exercises, playing with words or phrases also get the juices flowing. And frankly, the act of writing anything at all turns into inspiration for something larger.

For information about their works check out Carroll’s website and Noronha’s website. And don’t forget to attend their upcoming reading event on April 10. For information on the reading event, click here.

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Upcoming events!!

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BrickHouse Books proudly presents….

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by | February 26, 2014 · 3:09 pm

Author uses website to share poetry

Fan of poetry? Even better- are you a fan of BrickHouse Books author Doritt Carroll’s works? Then check out Carroll’s website! The author has poems, books, and updated news/events featured on the website.

Carroll’s website is user-friendly, easy to navigate, and helps spread the love of great poetry!

Doritt Carroll’s website: http://www.dorittcarroll.com/#!poems/cwo

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Pushcart Prize nominees!

BrickHouse Books is proud to announce its 2013 nominees for the Pushcart Prize:  for poetry, Doritt Carroll, author of GLTTL STP, and Peter Weltner, author of To the Final Cinder.

To find the books, go here.

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The spoken and unspoken moments of Carroll’s GLTTL STOP

GLTTL STPGLTTL STP by Doritt Carroll

BrickHouse Books 2013 $12.00

A review by Sonja James

Beginning with the title, GLTTL STP, Doritt Carroll’s new book of poems encourages us to consider the importance of what is present and what is absent in our understanding of the world. Though Carroll has removed the vowels from the title, she kindly defines herself and her project by clarifying the title in the epigraph at the beginning of the book. “GLTTL STP” is “glottal stop,” which is “a sound produced in speech or singing by a momentary complete closure of the glottis.” This is also described as “a tightening or choking off of sound.”

Carroll simplifies this definition in the title poem, “glttl stp.” She clarifies herself in the opening lines: “everything good/is in the things/that we don’t say.” She then gives examples of “glottal stop” with images from everyday life: the space between sculptures in a museum, the moment before a struck match bursts into flame, and the tension in the air before a recess bell rings. She concludes with the image of two birds pausing in their song “because it was/the right place/in both of their songs/to pause/the/glottal stop.”

After establishing these parameters of the spoken and the unspoken, Carroll then decides on the concrete content of exactly what she is willing to reveal about herself in subsequent poems. In the poem, “2010,” she writes of the death of her father while distancing herself from it. She writes of herself in the third person: “the year her father died/Christmas wasn’t awful/just divided.” In “report,” Carroll reverts to the first person and gives a cheerful account of an ordinary day of life.

The upbeat mood does not last. She then writes four poems that are reflections on various aspects of death: “final commendation,” “death poem #5,” “in re: the scheduled rapture,” and “erasure.” The opening lines of “erasure” sum up the finality of death: “everybody dies the same/boning up like skeletons/stinking like toilets.”

In “first apt.,” Carroll turns to a different subject when she describes an incident of marital discord between a newly married couple. In “to each,” she elaborates on the theme of relationships:

we come into this place

trailing clouds of others

daughters and husbands

mothers we hated

lovers we rejected

and forgot about

loved

forgot again

The closing poem of the volume, “edits,” compares life to the act of poetic creation. Carroll addresses herself as “you:” “you’ve already written the poem/but now you have to fix it.” The poem she speaks of stands for the act of living one’s life. Everything in the poem is “in the wrong order” and the poem and she have “never really gotten along.” The poem can’t be erased because it has been written “in ink.” At this point she tells herself “there’s no more blank paper/so the only thing you/can really do with it is/revise/revise/revise.”

And so the volume concludes with this note of hope. Life in its permanence and vast array of mistakes can be revised. Carroll has spoken, revealing herself as one who is overtly silent and yet profoundly vocal. This is “glottal stop.” The vowels have been restored in this book celebrating and defining what one poet is willing to say and not say. The poems in GLTTL STP transport us to the edge of speech and then save us from any temptation to leap in despair. This is an exciting book and one worth reading.

Sonja James is the author of Baiting the Hook (the Bunny & the Crocodile Press, 1999), Children of the Moon (Argonne House Press, 2004), and Calling Old Ghosts to Supper (Finishing Line Press, 2013).

Poets are invited to submit recent books for review consideration. Contact Sonja James at sonjajames@earthlink.net

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Kind words for GLTTL STP

Amazon user Margaret “Margie” E. Ott recently wrote a review for BrickHouse Books author Doritt Carroll’s collection of poems, GLTTL STP. On top of the review, Margie gave GLTTL STP five out of five stars. Her comment then became a top reviewed ranking comment. Margie had this to say:

“Sprinkled throughout with wry humor, Glttl Stp explores the things left unsaid, the spaces between people, the distance between birth and death. In this volume of powerful poems, Doritt Carroll gives voice to the pains of middle age – illness, aging parents, departing children, regret, death. Excerpt:

old bag

she rattled around the house
like the last chip in the bag

planning to ignore the phone
if it rang
except it didn’t

she would bathe
if a reason came up

the t.v. so loud
the pixels floated
in the room
like the sparkles of dust
the afternoon sun
was just catching

specks of the show
and specks of the real
right next to each other
in the air like jots of color
in an impressionist’s painting

outside
the forsythias stuck yellow
out through snow
like caution signs saying
don’t wind up
like this”

Check out the review here and buy GLTTL STOP here.

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Upcoming book party for GLTTL STP

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Join us for a book party for GLTTL STP, a collection of poems by Doritt Carroll! The party will be held Friday, September 27th at 7pm located at The Black Squirrel 2427 18th St., N.W., Washington, DC. Check out our Facebook for more on the event. Hope to see you there!

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