GRETCHEN

Edward McCrorie has published four books of his own poetry as well as verse translations of the Aeneid and  the Odyssey. His translation of the Iliad is forthcoming from the Johns Hopkins University Press. He is currently working on long poems about George Washington and Woodrow Wilson. Professor Emeritus of English at Providence College, he lives in Newport, RI, and in New York City.

GONE GAMES

Edward McCrorie has published four books of his own poetry as well as verse translations of the Aeneid and  the Odyssey. His translation of the Iliad is forthcoming from the Johns Hopkins University Press. He is currently working on long poems about George Washington and Woodrow Wilson. Professor Emeritus of English at Providence College, he lives in Newport, RI, and in New York City.

BURIED IN THE MIND’S BACKYARD

William M. Rivera was born in New Orleans and began publishing poetry in the 1950s.   His early poetry appeared under the names William Rivera and William McLeod Rivera in THE NATION, PRAIRIE SCHOONER, THE KENYON REVIW, and many other publications.   He did not stop writing despite his later career movements but discontinued efforts to publish. Recently, however, he has begun submitting his poems again and has been published under his initials, WMR, in CALIFORNIA QUARTERLY, GARGOYLE, and GHAZAL.

A first book of his poetry was published in 1960, titled THE END OFLEGEND’S STRING, illustrated by Mexican artist Jose Luis Cuevas.  His professional activities in agricultural development have taken him to more than 30 countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America.  Retired from the University of Maryland, he is putting together a new collection of his poetry, REBOOTING.

Sirens’ Songs

Author-artist Elisabeth Stevens lived for several decades in Baltimore and now lives and works in Sarasota, FL.  Stevens is the author of six books of poery, six books of short fiction, and many articles and reviews about art, artists, and writers.  She is a graduatae of WEllesley College and Columbia University.

A former art and architecture critic for THE BALTIMORE SUN and a former art critic for THE WASHINGTON POST, THE WALL STREET JOURNAL, and THE TRENTON TIMES, Stevens is instinctively a “word-picture” person.   She has designed and illustrated many of her books with original graphics.  This 2011 BrickHouse Books edition of SIRENS’ SONGS represents a paperback facsimile of the 2010 SIRENS’ SONGS, LIVRE D’ARTISTE published by Goss Press in a limited edition of 20 copies with original etchings in a clamshell box.

B’KLYN

Richard Fein brings Brooklyn to life in this amazing collection. Fein draws upon his Jewish heritage and childhood memories to create an eclectic experience filled with both tradition and exploration. It touches on both the past and movement into the future with strains of Whitman and inspiring energy.

This upcoming collection is a must-read.

If “only the dead know Brooklyn”—then only the living can know theB’KLYN of Richard J. Fein: in poems that take us all around the boroughin despair and exultation. Love the heartbreaking and heartfelt poetry of Richard J. Fein!

—Ted Richer

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A School for Fishermen

This exceptional debut collection from Carlo Matos touches upon such subjects as family, heritage, identity, and the stories that are passed down through generations. He creates a beautiful yet unsettling, surreal world in his poetry that captures the attention of even the most jaded audience.  Matos uses his heritage as a native of the Azores Archipelago and holds it up for all to see through odd relations and captivating poetry that utilizes many aspects of the island.

“Animal, vegetable, or mineral? You never know quite what to expect in A School for Fishermen by Carlo Matos. Populated with distant (and distanced) relatives, not-so-clandestine aggairs, and a lemur, Matos conflates the bestial, natural world with the human—characters with “stingers like pigtails” and string theory mashed with marsh gas. Unafraid to look into the vastness of existence, Matos often arrives at the somber—always “one short of the solution,” where “the keys don’t catch.” Yet for Matos, somehow everything “ends in repair”, bringing us, dear reader, hope”

—Brandi Homan

Order A School for Fishermen by Carlo Matos