NEW RELEASE – Donald Richardson’s ReUNIONS

Cover of ReUNIONS by Donald Richardson. Cover is mostly blank, with the sketch of a man with his back slightly turned toward us. His posture is relaxed; his hands are in his pockets, his sleeves rolled up, and he appears to be reflecting on his life. A signature of the artist, Bob Callahan, is prominently figured beside the man. TEXT reads: ReUNIONS: New and Selected Poems by Donald Richardson.We are happy to announce the release of ReUNIONS, New and Selected Poems by Donald Richardson!

This new collection of poetry from Donald Richardson is quilted from decades of work, spanning from Knocking Them Dead and Night Waters to Romantic Unions, new poems from 2016 and 2017. In many ways, the poems are messages to loved ones, a scrapbook of memories and reflections, things so deeply personal yet ubiquitous to the human experience.

Portraits on the cover, beautifully rendered by artist Bob Callahan, capture the essence of reflection, and are the perfect partners to Richardson’s poems.

You can pick up your fantastic copy, available in paperback for $15.00 USD, directly from BrickHouse Books!  The first 100 orders receive FREE SHIPPING!  Simply click the link below for our order form.  Mail your order, along with a check payable to BrickHouse Books, Inc., to:

BrickHouse Books, Inc.
306 Suffolk Road
Baltimore, MD 21218-2521

BrickHouse Books, Inc. is a Maryland non-profit corporation.  10% of your payment is tax deductible.

Click here to order ReUNIONS ]

or

[ Visit ReUNION ‘s page in the BHB Catalogue for more information ]

 

Upcoming Reading with BHB Poet William Rivera

Poet William Rivera (Buried in the Mind’s Backyard, BrickHouse Books, 2011) will be joining poet Elisavietta Ritchie (Reflections: Poems on Paintings) at the Kensington Row Bookshop for a reading.

SAVE THE DATE!

Wednesday, June 28th @ 7pm
Kensington Row Bookshop
3786 Howard Ave
Kensington, MD

See you there!

Readings and Release Party for Doritt Carroll’s New Book

Doritt Carroll, BrickHouse Books’ Poetry Editor, released Sorry You Are Not an Instant Winner via Kattywompus Press.

SAVE THE DATES!

Listen to Carroll herself read selections from this jovial collection, and join her for the release party in September!

READINGS:

Third Saturday Reading Event
June 17th, 2pm – 4pm
Robert Harper Books
6216 Rhode Island Ave.
Riverdale Park, MD 20737

Georgetown Library – Date TBA!

RELEASE PARTY:

September 28, Time TBA
The Barking Dog
4723 Elm St.
Bethesda, MD 20814

For more information on Doritt Carroll and her work, visit dorittcarroll.com.

A Chance To Be Published

Charlie Bondhus, past winner of the Stonewall Chapbook Competition, is looking for submissions for The Good Men Project‘s but poems with a certain perspective. If you’ve written a poem dealing in some way about men or masculinity, submit your poetry to The Good Men Project. Even though the poem should be about men or masculinity, the poem can also be from women and people of all gender identities and expressions. For more information on their guidelines, check out their website here. And for a taste of their poetry check out their archive here. Good luck!

Honoring Baltimore Poet With Her Poetry

In honor of Baltimore poet Dyane Fancey, Baltimore Fishbowl featured an article, “Baltimore Poet Dyane Fancey Dies, Leaves Us with Perfect Poem,” discussing her poem “Multitasking.” The article wonderfully analyzes Fancey’s poem and, despite Fancey’s passing, reminds us death “is as good a reason as any not to worry, but instead simply to “Be here, / Here, now.”

Fancey’s work includes “A Religion of Skin,” published by The New Poets Series (now BrickHouse Books). For more information about Fancey, read The Baltimore Sun‘s article on the poet here.

New review for Doritt Carroll’s GLTTL STP

Featured on Washington Independent Review Of Books, Grace Cavalieri reviewed Doritt Carroll’s GLTTL STP while showcasing Carroll’s poems.

Check out Cavalieri’s review below:

GLTTL STPThe title stands for glottal stop, a choking sound produced in the throat; and the words’ conversion to a book title without vowels is just one  sample of a woman who is a risk taker and a safety net all it once. Dorrit Carroll is sublime. What does she do and how does she do it? First, we start with the quality of her mind – the poem cannot be any better than the person who presses it into being. Her mind is like a giant constellation from which tiny zodiacs occur perfectly formed.

From the poem father:

… I say that I can’t miss you/because you are inside me/is it your lips/or mine/that press together/as if they are sealing off/an envelope of disappointment//your or my finicky way/of straightening a desk/pinching each paperclip/between thumb and forefinger/as if it’s a dead fly//and whose measuring eyes/appraise me/from the mirror//composed/perhaps/to a fault

Or look at this poem titled p.m.:

the night you/ gurgled yourself dead/your breaths sounded like/bubbles blown through a stroll//as if the milk of you were being drunk /by a greedy child somewhere/with no manners// and then at last the straw hit/the bottom of the glass/because the bubble stopped//and you/glass that you were/looked no different/empty/than you had/full

Sometimes she just snapshots a scene:

the Christmas trees

lie on their sides

on the curb

as if they’d been shot

just steps from their

front doors

as if they’d almost

made it

to safety

Doritt Carroll’s poetry is concrete and allegorical at once. Poetry never repeats itself and yet   poems are made of the same old words we all use. Caroll’s impulses are her ideas. She hones each thought diligently until it acts precisely the way she chooses. Anyone can have a flash/an inspiration, but the implementation tells all. These are carefully made poems from templates that have antecedents in our craft, but that are particularly targeted on a page that could belong to no one else. Who knows what Carroll is made of and she, herself, wonders here:

valentine

the heart

is a complicated instrument
 

four adjoining chambers

in which
 

God knows what

goes on

To check out more of Cavalieri’s reviews, go here.