From Daingerfield Island to Main Street

BrickHouse Books’ author John Adam Wasowicz recently mused on the impact of independent bookstores on our local Main Streets. Published by the Washington Independent Review of Books, “Bookstores: The Heart of Main Street” was inspired by Wasowicz’s first-hand experiences in independent bookstores during his tour for Daingerfield Island. The essay is a must-read for any bookstore lover whose been worried about the stability of brick and mortars in a digital age.


Washington Independent Review of Books Features Doritt Carroll’s Latest Release

“What powers the work of Carroll is bold truth, intellectual firepower, and emotional experiences that raise good dust — after the settling, nothing is the same.” — Grace Cavalieri, Washington Independent Review of Books

Grace Cavalieri’s recent review of Doritt Carroll’s sorry you are not an instant winner reads like the poetry that appears in her monthly column. Head over to WIRoBooks and read why Cavalieri calls Carroll’s writing something she “won’t forget.”

Congratulations, Doritt!

Doritt Carroll is BrickHouse Books’ Poetry Editor and author of two BHB titles, In Caves and GLTTL STP. sorry you are not an instant winner was published with Kattywompus Press earlier this year.

New review for Doritt Carroll’s GLTTL STP

Featured on Washington Independent Review Of Books, Grace Cavalieri reviewed Doritt Carroll’s GLTTL STP while showcasing Carroll’s poems.

Check out Cavalieri’s review below:

GLTTL STPThe title stands for glottal stop, a choking sound produced in the throat; and the words’ conversion to a book title without vowels is just one  sample of a woman who is a risk taker and a safety net all it once. Dorrit Carroll is sublime. What does she do and how does she do it? First, we start with the quality of her mind – the poem cannot be any better than the person who presses it into being. Her mind is like a giant constellation from which tiny zodiacs occur perfectly formed.

From the poem father:

… I say that I can’t miss you/because you are inside me/is it your lips/or mine/that press together/as if they are sealing off/an envelope of disappointment//your or my finicky way/of straightening a desk/pinching each paperclip/between thumb and forefinger/as if it’s a dead fly//and whose measuring eyes/appraise me/from the mirror//composed/perhaps/to a fault

Or look at this poem titled p.m.:

the night you/ gurgled yourself dead/your breaths sounded like/bubbles blown through a stroll//as if the milk of you were being drunk /by a greedy child somewhere/with no manners// and then at last the straw hit/the bottom of the glass/because the bubble stopped//and you/glass that you were/looked no different/empty/than you had/full

Sometimes she just snapshots a scene:

the Christmas trees

lie on their sides

on the curb

as if they’d been shot

just steps from their

front doors

as if they’d almost

made it

to safety

Doritt Carroll’s poetry is concrete and allegorical at once. Poetry never repeats itself and yet   poems are made of the same old words we all use. Caroll’s impulses are her ideas. She hones each thought diligently until it acts precisely the way she chooses. Anyone can have a flash/an inspiration, but the implementation tells all. These are carefully made poems from templates that have antecedents in our craft, but that are particularly targeted on a page that could belong to no one else. Who knows what Carroll is made of and she, herself, wonders here:


the heart

is a complicated instrument

four adjoining chambers

in which

God knows what

goes on

To check out more of Cavalieri’s reviews, go here.